Thursday, August 02, 2007

First Aids Of Burn

Burn is something condition made people doing wrong when the accident occured. It make confuse to anywho geeting burn so you have to be understand how to do and how to help to the victim, why? because if you don't understand it will make worst to the victim even you will geeting serious problem also if burn stiil on.

Management for burn as immediate action are:
  1. “Stop, Drop, and Roll” to smother flames.
  2. Try to remove all burned clothing. If clothing adheres to the skin, cut or tear around burned area.
  3. Try to remove all jewelry, belts, tight clothing, etc., from over the burned areas and from around the victim’s neck. This is very important; burned areas swell immediately.

State of burns
First-Degree Burns

First-degree burns involve the top layer of skin.
Signs:
  • Red colour
  • Very painful to touch
  • Skin will show mild swelling
Treatment:
  • Apply cool, wet compresses, or immerse in cool, fresh water. Continue until pain subsides.
  • Cover the burn with a sterile, non-adhesive bandage or clean cloth.
  • Do not use ointments or butter to burn; these may cause infection.
  • Over-the-counter pain medications may be used to help relieve pain and reduce inflammation.
  • The first degree burns usually heal without further treatment. However, if a first-degree burn covers a large area of the body, or the victim is an infant or elderly, seek emergency medical attention.

Second-Degree Burns
Second-degree burns involve the first two layers of skin.

Signs:
  • Deep reddening of the skin
  • Pain
  • Come to blisters
  • Glossy appearance from leaking fluid
  • Possible loss of some skin
Treatment:
  • Immerse in fresh, cool water, or apply cool compresses. Continue for 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Dry with clean cloth and cover with sterile gauze.
  • Do not break blisters.
  • Do not apply ointments or butter to burns; these may cause infection
  • Take steps to prevent shock: lay the victim flat, elevate the feet about 12 inches, and cover the victim with a coat or blanket. Do not place the victim in the shock position if a head, neck, back, or leg injury is suspected, or if it makes the victim uncomfortable.
  • Further medical treatment is required. Do not attempt to treat serious burns unless you are a trained health professional.
Third-Degree Burns
A third-degree burn penetrates the entire thickness of the skin and permanently destroys tissue.

Signs:
  • Loss of skin layers
  • Often painless. (Pain may be caused by patches of first- and second-degree burns which often surround third-degree burns).
  • Skin is dry and leathery
  • Skin may appear charred or have patches which appear white, brown or black
Treatment:
  • Cover burn lightly with sterile gauze or clean cloth. (Do not use material that can leave lint on the burn).
  • Do not apply ointments or butter to burns; these may cause infection
  • Take steps to prevent shock: lay the victim flat, elevate the feet about 12 inches.
  • Elevate burned area higher than the victim’s head when possible. Keep person warm and comfortable, and watch for signs of shock.
  • Do not place a pillow under the victim’s head if the person is lying down and there is an airway burn. This can close the airway.
  • Immediate medical attention is required. Do not attempt to treat serious burns unless you are a trained health professional.
Sources and condenced

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